Benedict’s Brother, by Tricia Walker, The book tells the story of a young woman, Benedict, who is asked by her Uncle, a former Japanese prisoner- of- war to scatter his ashes from the bridge on  the river Kwai in Thailand, she has no idea why. The novel became the biggest best selling debut launch of an unknown author in the borders UK bookstores that year, and sold its first print run in six month it was selected as the top 3 book of the year in Publishing News, alongside  Ian McEwen’s On Chesil Beach and that years Costa Book award winner What was Lost by Catherine O’Flynn

Tricia had inherited her father’s talent for writing, Peter Walker who wrote under the pen name Nicholas Rhea, wrote hundreds of books  his constable series of books inspired the long running, The Yorkshire Television production Heartbeat.


Stories, people, places

“These are all part of the fabric of my life, of all our lives. My aim as a writer is to produce the most beautiful stories that I have in me and to present them to you. It is important to me that your experience of my work is as beautiful as I can possibly make it.

That work never stops.

Thank you for visiting the Appeal website and for the many of you who support its aims by buying my book.

Tricia xx

The print edition of this book is only available through this website.

£10 inc p&p
If buying outside the UK please add £2 to your order

For every book sold, 30% will be paid in support of SSAFA

 

Just read it – Once you start reading you will simply want to keep on turning the pages until you reach the end. You will be drawn into taking the journey with the characters which you will find challenging compelling and emotional but a journey none the less worth taking. It is a beautifully written story by Tricia Walker that will pull at the heart, but enrich your own journey through life if you let it.

From the moment Benedict is told of her Uncle Erno’s bequest – money and an instruction to scatter his ashes from the Bridge on the River Kwai – we are with her on a journey of understanding. Why did Uncle Erno want his ashes returned to where he was a prisoner of the Japanese during WW2? And – almost incidental at first – why did Benedict’s brother Antony become a Buddhist monk in Thailand?

Written in diary style, Benedict’s Brother is a deceptively simple tale of love and loss, life and death, in the remote north-east of Thailand. Uncle Erno’s bequest means that Benedict can also visit her brother – her last living relative – and perhaps gain some answers.

Beauty and fresh experience is all around – Benedict is captivated by the place, the local people, by the monastery’s daily rituals, and by her brother’s friends. As a foreigner in a strange land she is a young woman we can all identify with – struggling to make sense of everything. There is humour even in her frustrations, and her journey reveals some surprising and unexpected contrasts – not least when she visits the River Kwai.


Excerpts from Uncle Erno’s fragile wartime diary reveal the depths of cruelty imposed during the building of the railway, and yet Benedict’s experience there is one of the most moving parts of the book.


A beautiful, moving story which draws parallels between past and present – and best of all, has love and understanding at the end of it.

If you’ve ever been lucky enough to go to Kanchanaburi, in Western Thailand, this book will resonate. And if you haven’t been there, it will make you want to.

And just a few of the amazing reviews for the book

…“A wonderful and evocative story, that will be visually stunning on the screen. The images of Thailand, of the monastery and the monks are the perfect visual backdrop on which to play out the spiritual adventure that Benedict undertakes. The parallel narrative told via Benedict’s uncle’s diary entries during his time as a prisoner of war will provide a visceral and moving juxtaposition to Benedict’s story.”

Norma Heyman, Academy Award-Winning Film Producer



“An extraordinary book, beautifully written and heartbreaking, felt that I was taking the journey with the writer, smelling the flowers and listening to the river flowing, and sobbed my heart out at the brutality and inhuman treatment of all the prisoners of war. Would urge everyone to take some quality time and quietly read this, it helps to heal some of the scars left behind by the loss of the forgotten ones. Importantly their legacy is now in the hands of their children and the Hut and Garden at the National Arboretum is a reflective and inspirational place to visit.”

Sally Lucas, New York, FEPOW relative…

“Just read it – Once you start reading you will simply want to keep on turning the pages until you reach the end. You will be drawn into taking the journey with the characters which you will find challenging compelling and emotional but a journey none the less worth taking. It is a beautifully written story by Tricia Walker that will pull at the heart, but enrich your own journey through life if you let it.” 



“From the moment Benedict is told of her Uncle Erno’s bequest – money and an instruction to scatter his ashes from the Bridge on the River Kwai – we are with her on a journey of understanding. Why did Uncle Erno want his ashes returned to where he was a prisoner of the Japanese during WW2? And – almost incidental at first – why did Benedict’s brother Antony become a Buddhist monk in Thailand?” 



“Written in diary style, Benedict’s Brother is a deceptively simple tale of love and loss, life and death, in the remote north-east of Thailand. Uncle Erno’s bequest means that Benedict can also visit her brother – her last living relative – and perhaps gain some answers.”

“Fantastic and timeless, an easy read but an emotionally engaging one. A real page turner.”



“5 Stars awarded – need I say more!”



“It’s a book that makes me smile when I decide to read it again. It’s a keeper!”



“If you’ve ever been lucky enough to go to Kanchanaburi, in Western Thailand, this book will resonate. And if you haven’t been there, it will make you want to.”



“I enjoyed reading this book more than I expected. It made one think of what POW’s went through and endured while building the Burma railway.”